Arms & Security Project

About Arms & Security Project

Promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade.

The Arms and Security Project engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

- Promoting substantial cuts in military spending as an integral part of any plan to reduce the federal deficit.

- Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

- Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation, poised to sell $40 billion in weaponry in 2011 alone.

Advancing a Sustainable, Just and Peaceful World

By Bill Goodfellow

Nov-10-2014 | Report

Check out what the Center for International Policy has been up to in 2014 with our end-of-year brochure... Read More »

The Littoral Combat Ship: The Warship That Can’t Go to War

By

Aug-26-2014 | Policy Brief

The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is the Navy’s response to perceived changes in naval warfare and falling budgets. In theory, the LCS is a multifaceted and cost-effective answer to these requirements. In reality, the LCS is an overpriced, underperforming vessel that does not meet current needs and is a bad deal for taxpayers... Read More »

Report to Supporters Spring 2014

By Bill Goodfellow

May-19-2014 | Report

2014 has been a successful year so far with major advances in reshaping defense spending, curbing tax evasion and advancing awareness on global climate change... Read More »

The Word Is Out: The U.S. Once Again Leads the World in Arms Sales

By William D. Hartung

Apr-21-2015 | Article

The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) has released its annual assessment of the global arms trade, and the United States once again has the dubious distinction on coming in at the number-one spot. For the period covering 2010 to 2014, the U.S. accounted for 31 percent of global arms sales, followed by Russia at 27 percent. The next largest exporters — China, (5%), France (5%), Germany (5%) and the United Kingdom (4%) — lagged far behind... Read More »

The Price of Peace: Why War is Bad for People, but Good for Business

By William D. Hartung

Apr-20-2015 | Article

A reduction of tensions in the Middle East could be bad news for Lockheed Martin, the world’s largest arms-producing corporation... Read More »

On Pentagon Spending, Will the Real Rand Paul Please Stand Up?

By William D. Hartung

Apr-14-2015 | Article

Rand Paul announced his candidacy for the presidency last week under the slogan"Defeat the Washington Machine, Unleash the American Dream." Yet he seems to be ready to give the biggest Washington machine of all - the Pentagon - a free pass... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

Myths vs. Realities of Pentagon Spending

By William D. Hartung, Stephen Miles

Jul-17-2012 | Fact Sheet

As defense contractors play to American's fears of poor security to increase military spending, Bill Hartung and Stephen Miles reveal the facts about Pentagon spending... Read More »

Military Spending: A Poor Job Creator

By William D. Hartung

Jan-17-2012 | Policy Brief, Fact Sheet

Plans for cutting the federal deficit have raised an important question: what impact would military spending reductions have on jobs? This fact sheet is an update with new numbers from 2011 for U.S. employment effects of military and domestic spending. ... Read More »

CIP in the Press