Arms & Security Project

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About Arms & Security Project

The Arms and Security Project engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.
  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.
  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.

The Military Budget and the Costs of War: The Coming Trump Storm

By William D. Hartung

Apr-12-2017 | Report

The Costs of War Project at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and the Center for International Policy released a report today on the proposed Trump military budget in historical, strategic, and budgetary perspective. The report entitled, The Military Budget and the Costs of War: The Coming Trump Storm, reveals the full costs of U.S. spending on national security-related functions and demonstrates that much of that money is being misspent due to special interest lobbying and a distorted view of what will make America and its allies safer... Read More »

Articles and Media Appearances 2016

By William D. Hartung

Jan-19-2017 |

This report summarizes articles and media appearances by Arms and Security Project director William D. Hartung during 2016. The project’s work during 2016 focused on reining in Pentagon spending and reducing arms transfers to the Middle East, as part of a larger effort to promote a more effective U.S. foreign policy that focuses on preventing conflict rather than engaging in military action... Read More »

U.S. Arms Transfers to Saudi Arabia and the War in Yemen

By William D. Hartung

Dec-01-2016 | Policy Brief

This issue brief provides information on the amounts and types of U.S.-supplied equipment in the Saudi arsenal, with a focus on air and ground forces. Much of this equipment has been put to use in the war in Yemen.... Read More »

Donald Trump and The Death of Diplomacy

By William D. Hartung

Apr-26-2017 |

Donald Trump prides himself on being the master of the “art of the deal.” But if his plans to slash spending on diplomacy are approved by Congress, there won’t be anybody home to make deals with other governments, except for Trump and his inner circle, who have so far shown a shocking lack of knowledge of foreign affairs... Read More »

Trump bombings: The mother of all distractions?

By William D. Hartung

Apr-14-2017 |

Is there a new Trump doctrine in the making, or has the President simply found a formula for distracting the public and the media from his troubles at home: from allegations of collusion with Russia during the 2016 election to his failure at pushing through his most cherished domestic initiatives... Read More »

Reviving the Peace Movement for the 21st Century: Responses to Daniel May

By William D. Hartung

Mar-23-2017 |

Daniel May’s essay in the most recent issue of The Nation, “How to Revive the Peace Movement in the Trump Era,” has stirred up a lot of conversation on the left. In the wake of Trump’s election, May argued, “we need a movement that can speak to the anger that so many Americans feel toward the corporate powers that dominate our politics. Such a movement would expose how militarism is not immune to that influence but is particularly beholden to it.” Here we publish responses to May’s argument from five peace advocates.... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

National Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism

Nov-20-15 | Temple Beth Shalom 205 E. Barcelona Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87505

Mel Goodman to speak on "National Insecurity: The Cost of American Militarism" in Santa Fe... Read More »

CIP in the Press
  • CNN panelist nails Trump’s ‘P.T. Barnum foreign policy’ as the ‘mother of all distractions’

    William D. Hartung interviewed

    Raw Story, 04-17-17

    “Is there a new Trump doctrine in the making, or has the president simply found a formula for distracting the public and the media from his troubles at home?” wrote William Hartung, the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy, on CNN...Read More »

  • Does Trump Stand to Profit Personally Off the Wars

    William D. Hartung interviewed

    Democracy Now!, 04-11-17

    Does President Trump stand to personally profit off the wars he is escalating in Iraq, Yemen, Syria, Somalia and beyond? That’s the question many are asking, after it emerged that Trump has personally invested in Raytheon, the military contractor who makes the Tomahawk missiles used in the U.S. strike on a Syrian airbase last week. Raytheon’s stocks briefly surged after the attack...Read More »

  • Trump Greenlights Arms Sales to Bahrain and Many Other Countries

    William D. Hartung interviewed

    The Real News Network, 04-02-17

    The Trump administration informed Congress on Wednesday, that it plans to approve the sale of 19 F-16 fighter jets, to the small Arab kingdom of Bahrain. The multi-billion dollar sale had been held up by President Obama because of human rights concerns in the island nation. The approval of the sale is just the latest in a series of signs that the Trump administration is loosening human rights considerations, when it comes to promoting U.S. arms deals. Other potential buyers of U.S. arms that had been previously been put on hold, include Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Egypt and Taiwan...Read More »