Arms & Security Project

About Arms & Security Project

Promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade.

The Arms and Security Project engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

- Promoting substantial cuts in military spending as an integral part of any plan to reduce the federal deficit.

- Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

- Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation, poised to sell $40 billion in weaponry in 2011 alone.

Advancing a Sustainable, Just and Peaceful World

By Bill Goodfellow

Nov-10-2014 | Report

Check out what the Center for International Policy has been up to in 2014 with our end-of-year brochure... Read More »

The Littoral Combat Ship: The Warship That Can’t Go to War

By

Aug-26-2014 | Policy Brief

The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is the Navy’s response to perceived changes in naval warfare and falling budgets. In theory, the LCS is a multifaceted and cost-effective answer to these requirements. In reality, the LCS is an overpriced, underperforming vessel that does not meet current needs and is a bad deal for taxpayers... Read More »

Report to Supporters Spring 2014

By Bill Goodfellow

May-19-2014 | Report

2014 has been a successful year so far with major advances in reshaping defense spending, curbing tax evasion and advancing awareness on global climate change... Read More »

The Madness of Funding the Pentagon to “Cover the Globe”

By William D. Hartung

Mar-26-2015 | Article

Current levels of Pentagon spending may not be able to support current defense strategy. The answer to this problem is right before our eyes: cut the money and change the strategy. That would be acting in the name of a conception of national security that was truly strategic... Read More »

Smarter Spending at the Pentagon Would Satisfy Defense and Deficit Hawks

By William D. Hartung

Mar-23-2015 | Article

The Pentagon wants more money. But the politics of Pentagon spending have gotten so contorted that it's hard to know who the important players are, much less how much money the department is likely to get when this year's budget wrangling is finally over. The final number will probably have less to do with partisan divisions than with resolving the split on the issue that exists inside the Republican Party... Read More »

Pentagon Budget Outlook: Cloudy With a Chance of Slush

By William D. Hartung

Mar-17-2015 | Article

It's an open secret that the Pentagon has routinely been using the war budget - known in Washington-ese as the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account - as a slush fund to pay for items that don't fit within the caps on its base budget that are currently the law of the land... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

Myths vs. Realities of Pentagon Spending

By William D. Hartung, Stephen Miles

Jul-17-2012 | Fact Sheet

As defense contractors play to American's fears of poor security to increase military spending, Bill Hartung and Stephen Miles reveal the facts about Pentagon spending... Read More »

Military Spending: A Poor Job Creator

By William D. Hartung

Jan-17-2012 | Policy Brief, Fact Sheet

Plans for cutting the federal deficit have raised an important question: what impact would military spending reductions have on jobs? This fact sheet is an update with new numbers from 2011 for U.S. employment effects of military and domestic spending. ... Read More »

CIP in the Press