Common Defense Campaign

About Common Defense Campaign

Winding down the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and promoting affordable security.

The Center for International Policy’s Common Defense Campaign has three specific goals: 1) to wind down the war in Afghanistan; 2) complete the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq; and 3) make real, lasting cuts in the military budget.  An equally important but harder to quantify goal is to change the way America relates to the rest of the world.  Gone are the days when America could go it alone.

America spends well over one trillion dollars a year on the military when spending by other government departments is included, including the Energy Department’s budget for nuclear weapons and $81 billion for intelligence agencies.  Given that America’s annual deficit is about one-and-a-half trillion dollars, one could argue that military spending is all borrowed money.

The growing consensus that military spending must be brought under control presents an historic opportunity to both cut spending and also to reevaluate how and when America uses its military forces.  We see an opportunity for an alliance with conservatives who share our skepticism about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and believe that the Pentagon budget is rife with waste and unnecessary spending that has nothing to do with national defense.

The Common Defense Campaign coordinates the work of CIP’s five security projects: the Afghanistan Study Group, the Win Without War coalition, the Arms & Security Project, the Project on Defense Alternatives and the National Security Project.

Advancing a Sustainable, Just and Peaceful World

By Bill Goodfellow

Nov-10-2014 | Report

Check out what the Center for International Policy has been up to in 2014 with our end-of-year brochure... Read More »

Something in the Air: “Isolationism,” Defense Spending, and the U.S. Public Mood

By Carl Conetta

Oct-14-2014 | Report

Is the public trending toward isolationism? Or is interventionism back? Polls suggest a more complex truth... Read More »

The Littoral Combat Ship: The Warship That Can’t Go to War

By

Aug-26-2014 | Policy Brief

The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is the Navy’s response to perceived changes in naval warfare and falling budgets. In theory, the LCS is a multifaceted and cost-effective answer to these requirements. In reality, the LCS is an overpriced, underperforming vessel that does not meet current needs and is a bad deal for taxpayers... Read More »

The Pentagon Doesn't Need More Money

By William D. Hartung

Mar-02-2015 | Article

The Pentagon has more than enough funding to protect the country. But you would never know it if you listened to the cries for more coming from key members of Congress and hawkish DC think tanks... Read More »

Can the Violence in Honduras Be Stopped?

By Sarah Kinosian, William D. Hartung, Lisa Haugaard

Feb-19-2015 | Article

Nearly 100 percent of the murders in Honduras' second city go unsolved. Community development, not militarization, is the answer... Read More »

Why Should We Listen to Neoconservatives Who Criticize Obama?

By William D. Hartung

Feb-13-2015 | Letter

We will be living with the consequences of our disastrous intervention in Iraq for years to come. The last thing we should do is double down on the policies that got us into our current predicament in the first place... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

US Policy on Syria: War or Diplomacy?

By Carl Conetta

Sep-23-2013 | Fact Sheet

A selection of critical views and proposals on the way forward with Syria... Read More »

The American Public's View on U.S. Military Intervention in Syria

By Stephen Miles, Angela Miller

Sep-04-2013 | Fact Sheet

Win Without War compiled a fact sheet on opinions in the U.S. about a potential military intervention in Syria... Read More »

Four Decades of US Defense Spending

By Carl Conetta, Charles Knight,

Jan-25-2013 | Fact Sheet

A one page review and assessment of the change in US defense spending over 40 years... Read More »

CIP in the Press