Security Assistance Monitor

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About Security Assistance Monitor

Security Assistance Monitor is a program of the Center for International Policy, in collaboration with the Friends Committee on National Legislation, Latin America Working Group Education Fund, Project on Middle East Democracy and Washington Office on Latin America.

We track and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.

Our interactive database compiles all publicly available data on U.S. foreign security assistance programs worldwide from 2000 to the present. Collected from a wide range of government documents, the database provides detailed numbers on U.S. arms sales, military and police aid and training programs. Users can search these numbers by country, region, program and assistance type. Video tutorials and a frequently asked questions section show users how to find the numbers and information they need. Our programs pages provide descriptions of all U.S. security assistance programs.

While our database is global, our research and analysis provide more in-depth insight on U.S. security policy in Africa, Central Eurasia, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Middle East, which can be found in our blogfact sheets and publications. We also organize roundtables and briefings to promote a more nuanced understanding and encourage debate about key U.S. foreign security assistance issues.

In our extensive resource database of news, policy statements, legislation and events, users can find what lawmakers and experts are saying about U.S. global security policy, stay current with public events, hearings, official travel and reporting deadlines, and read all relevant security news for each of our focus regions.

See more at http://www.securityassistance.org.

Country Profile: U.S. Security Assistance to Tunisia

By Colby Goodman, Seth Binder, Project on Middle East Democracy

Apr-21-2015 | Policy Brief

Tunisia is widely credited with initiating the wave of revolutions that swept the Arab world in 2011. Following the ouster of former President Ben Ali, the country navigated an extremely difficult political transition that culminated in the formation of a democratically elected government under a new constitution in December 2014... Read More »

Honduras: A Government Failing to Protect Its People

By Sarah Kinosian, Lisa Haugaard

Mar-09-2015 | Report

Last December, the Latin America Working Group Education Fund (LAWGEF) and Center for International Policy (CIP) traveled to Honduras for a first-hand look at events in the country. What we found was a security situation in shambles and a country in dire need of reform. A number of alarming issues face Honduras today, including mass migration, the disturbing and highly visible militarization of law enforcement, grave threats against human rights defenders, and a lack of an effective and independent justice system... Read More »

Applying the Leahy Law to U.S. Military and Police Aid

By Colby Goodman, Seth Binder

Dec-01-2014 | Report

A guide on what the Leahy Law says, how the United States applies it and what organizations can do to encourage U.S. action against security forces accused of violations... Read More »

Why Haven’t We Defeated al-Shabaab?

By Diana Ohlbaum

Jan-30-2017 | Article

“We’ve been fighting al-Shabaab for a decade, why haven’t we won?” the Trump transition team asked the State Department. To foreign policy professionals, such questions may sound naïve and uninformed. They may reflect “an overwhelmingly negative and disparaging outlook” on Africa, as one expert characterized them, and extreme skepticism about the value of foreign aid. But rather than debating the motives of those asking the questions, the national security establishment ought to seize the opportunity to reexamine some long-standing assumptions... Read More »

Pentagon will finally find out if it pays to assist foreign armies

By Diana Ohlbaum

Jan-25-2017 | Article

Since 9/11, the U.S. government has spent more than $250 billion to strengthen the security forces of over 130 countries. Yet there is remarkably little information about what is working, how and why... Read More »

Trump and Security Assistance

By Seth Binder

Nov-22-2016 | Article

U.S. security assistance has become one of the major foreign policy tools of the U.S. government since 9/11 to combat terrorism abroad, but this assistance is increasingly criticized for failing to achieve its objectives and in some cases exacerbating problems... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

Crisis in Yemen - Humanitarian and Security Consequences of Military Support to the Region

Oct-20-15 | The Stimson Center, 1211 Connecticut Ave NW, 8th Floor, Washington DC, 20036

An expert panel will look at the situation in Yemen today and the politics and consequences of adding additional military equipment to the conflict.... Read More »

September 9 Open Government Town Hall – Foreign Aid and Security Assistance Transparency

Sep-09-15 | POGO's Conference Room (1100 G St, NW, Suite 500-- entrance on 11th Street across from Metro Center). Call-in options available.

Dynamic speakers will engage in a lively discussion about government and civil society initiatives underway to make available information on foreign aid and security assistance, and impediments that remain for the public to access such information... Read More »

A Discussion on Citizen Security and the Way Forward

Sep-08-15 | Center for International Policy 2000 M Street NW Conference Room A (located in the basement) Washington, DC 20036

What's the best way forward for citizen security in Central America? Guatemala, Honduras and most recently El Salvador have all turned to their troops to provide domestic security. Advocates of this tactic highlight that the general population often supports deploying the armed forces and say the presence of soldiers deters violence in the short-term. Opponents point to increased human rights abuses carried out by troops and say it is ultimately ineffective in improving long-term security.... Read More »

CIP in the Press