Arms & Security Project

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About Arms & Security Project

The Arms and Security Project engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.
  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.
  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.

Pentagon Spending in Massachusetts

By William D. Hartung

Apr-06-2018 | Report

Massachusetts ranked 9th (USA Spending) in the country in Department of Defense (DoD) awards during FY2017, receiving $10.3 billion... Read More »

Pentagon Spending in Michigan

By William D. Hartung

Mar-24-2018 | Report

Michigan ranked 24 th (USA Spending) in the country in terms of Department of Defense (DoD) awards during FY2017, receiving $3.09 billion 1... Read More »

SAUDI ARMS SALES AND THE PROMISE OF JOBS

By William D. Hartung

Jan-29-2018 | Report

The promise of jobs created by US weapons exports plays a major role in generating support for arms sales in Congress and the Executive Branch. During President Trump’s 2017 state visit to Saudi Arabia, he pledged $110 billion in new arms offers in the name of “jobs, jobs, jobs.”... Read More »

Trump’s arms sales policy puts contractors above common sense

By William D. Hartung

Apr-19-2018 | Article

In a move that poses grave risks to U.S. security, the Trump administration’s newly released conventional arms transfer policy will put jobs and the interests of arms manufacturers ahead of safety, security, and human rights in its decisions on who the United States should arm... Read More »

How War and Weapons Trading Are Fueling the Global Refugee Crisis

By William D. Hartung

Apr-17-2018 | Article

Few would argue that the world faces a refugee crisis, but not nearly enough is being done to prevent the creation of new refugees or to help those already displaced from their homes... Read More »

Trump’s Wag The Dog Strategy On Syria Helps No One – Not Even Himself

By William D. Hartung

Apr-14-2018 | Article

After a few days of threatening tweets and tough guy rhetoric, Donald Trump went ahead and instructed the U.S. military to bomb Syria in response to a chemical weapons attack on civilians there that has been widely attributed to the Assad regime... Read More »

Recent Posts from our Blogs

US Role in a Changing World: Militarization of US Foreign Policy and the Future of Global Security

Apr-12-18 | Thursday, April 12, 2018 (Lunch) TIME: 11:30am – Bar opens; 12:15pm – Lunch served; 1-2pm – Presentation and Q&A EVENT TYPE: Speaker Luncheon

Join CIP's William Hartung at the Women's National Democratic Club for a lecture and lunch. This talk will discuss the consequences of our current approach to solving complex security challenges, and how to create a more effective, less militarized approach to protecting America and the world... Read More »

Investing in Minds, Not Missiles: Recucing the Treat of Nuclear War

Apr-09-18 | Panel A Continuing Dangers from Nuclear Weapons: The Weapons Lobby: William Hartung (Center for International Policy)

MIT Panel A - Continuing Dangers from Nuclear Weapons: The Weapons Lobby: William Hartung (Center for International Policy)... Read More »

Jobs, Security, and Human Rights: Striking a Balance in U.S. Arms Export Policy

Apr-05-18 | DATE: Thursday, April 5, 2018 TIME: 10:00 AM -11:30 AM (90 minutes) LOCATION: Center for International Policy, 2000 M Street NW, Basement Conf. Room A, Washington, DC 20036C, 20036

Join leading experts in this event, which will seek to answer two main questions: 1) Are arms exports the best way to create jobs in the United States?; and 2) How should the administration and the Congress balance economic, strategic, and human rights factors to ensure that U.S. arms exports are serving U.S. and global security interests? This event is co-hosted by the Security Assistance Monitor and Forum on the Arms Trade. Media are especially encouraged to attend.... Read More »

CIP in the Press